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Brand Spotlight: Meet Joybird

We’re constantly growing our Modsy Catalog and adding amazing new finds from the best retailers, budding designers, and hard-to-find brands across the country. Here, in our brand spotlight series, you’ll get to learn more about the Modsy brands you find our 3D designs, why we love them and some of our favorite pieces to use in your home

Up next: Meet Joybird!

Joybird furniture

Meet The Brand

Joybird is a young brand that offers a refreshed and energized take on classic Mid-Century Modern furniture that’s perfect for any contemporary, modern-eclectic interior.

While Joybird furniture references vintage Mid-Century shapes and forms, they’re built for today’s home and designed to last for decades. Joybird also sells curated decor and accents to compliment their furniture collections, so you’ll find everything to design your entire home.

What They’re Known For

Mid-century modern furniture refreshed for today! Joybird also offers bright, bold upholstery that you can customize in any of their hundreds of patterns and color fabrics, including pet and kid-friendly options. You can also count on Joybird furniture to have timely delivery because many of their staple pieces are often ready-to-ship.

Why We Love Them

Joybird furniture is all custom made by craftsmen to the specs you want, which means their pieces are always high quality and guaranteed to last you for years to come (they offer lifetime warranty on all their furniture!).

In addition to their impeccably made Mid-Century modern-style furniture, Joybird is also committed to sustainable practices, using eco-friendly fibers and foam in their upholstery. It’s easy to see why their customers leave rave Joybird reviews!

Our Stylists’ Picks From Joybird

Joybird furniture

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Hopson Sectional: This Joybird sectional is a practical investment piece for a wide range of different spaces, and its reversible chaise lets you arrange it to fit your specific needs. The low profile and deep seat make it a comfy seat that accommodates many people for lounging, while the neutral upholstery makes this a versatile sectional to pair with many different color schemes.

If you’re trying to decide whether a sectional is for you, get some inspo from our living room design ideas!

Joybird furniture

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Elliot Chair: A wide and deep club chair that’s designed for hours of lounging, you can place a pair of these seats in any living room corner to create an instant conversation spot. The back cushion tufting and tapered wood legs give the chairs a Mid-century Modern look, and the streamlined silhouette will look especially great with any of Joybird’s neutral upholstery fabrics.

Joybird furniture

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Hughes Sofa: With its classic Mid-century shape, flared arms, and rounded back, this Joybird sofa is a contemporary statement piece in any living room, bedroom, or family media room. It feels tailored yet still has casual, playful appeal, and opting for this royal blush pink upholstery will give it a bold and fun pop. If you’re looking for a Joybird couch that goes with neutrals and darker colors, this is the perfect piece for a style that’s both captivating and easy on the eyes.

Joybird furniture

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Soto Rocking Chair: This fresh take on a classic rocking chair features an angular design that’s perfect for a nursery or kids room. Similar to other Joybird furniture, it has a minimal and modern shape that’s easy to pair with other clean-lined pieces. Play up the warm wood tone of the chair frame with brightly colored seat cushions that add an eclectic pop.

Joybird furniture

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Bradshaw Chair: These Mid-century Modern-style armchairs rank high on our list of Joybird furniture must-haves. Made with warm natural wood, the sloped-arm and open frame design gives the chair an airy and approachable look and feel. Pair it with a bright and bold seat cushion color to inject instant zest and style into a living room, office, or bedroom.

Joybird furniture

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Hughes Bed: This tufted and streamline bed offers a fresh take on Mid-century style that’s perfect for today’s bedroom. The raised wood base and tapered legs add warmth to the cozy upholstered bed. Try a sumptuous gray upholstery fabric for a neutral that makes the bed a versatile foundation you can easily layer with a wide range of bright and soft colors.

Levi Chair: For a comfy reading chair you can sink into (and even nap in!), this deep seat with a slightly reclined back is the perfect stylish option. It has Mid-century clean lines but works beautifully in transitional, contemporary, and modern interiors. Opt for a bold color upholstery to set it apart from the rest of your furniture in a room.

Joybird furniture

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Jolie Accent Chair: Featuring a stunning curved silhouette and a cantilever seat design, this accent chair is made to be used in multiples—be it a pair in an office or a set around a dining table. The full barrel seat hugs and provides comfortable support for hours, while the open brass base offers tons of leg room below. Opt for bright velvet upholstery for an added touch of bold texture and glam style.

Joybird Mid Century modern living room

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Eliot Sofa: This timeless Joybird sofa is an extra-elegant statement piece when upholstered in a bold-hued leather. The modern rectilinear design makes it an instant focal point in any living space, and tufting detail will give it a super tailored and elevated look. Float the sofa in an open living space or set it against a bare while wall to give it centerstage in a room.

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Camille Bed: Nothing adds warmth and cozy vibes to a bedroom like a fully upholstered bed. With its deep panel tufting, this bed exudes Art Deco flair but has a modern elegance that makes it perfect for any bedroom or guest room in today’s home. We love it in a soft playful pink upholstery to give it a tailored yet tasteful and romantic feel.

Joybird furniture

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Zavier Desk: Love the Mid-century Mad Men vibe? This executive-style desk nails the look with its angular design and sculptural base with a center cutout. It comes with a large table surface for doing serious work while drawers on both sides of the desk add practical storage. If you’re looking for a modern desk that’s practical but still has tons of personality, this one has it all.

Joybird furniture

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Butler Console: Sophisticated, modern, and functional, this low-profile console cabinet adds instant streamlined style to any space while providing tons of practical storage. The dark-wood finish makes it versatile for both casual and formal spaces, andthe tapered legs keep it from appearing too bulky in rooms. Use it as a catchall and display in an entry, a TV stand in the living room, or a bar cabinet in a dining space.

Joybird furniture

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Hudson Coffee Table: Joybird furniture is known for their pieces designed for small-space living, and this stunning round coffee table is the perfect piece for apartments and compact living rooms. It has a very sculptural and design-forward look, and the natural raw wood pairs seamlessly with furnishings in different styles, from eclectic to rustic to contemporary.

Joybird furniture

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Blythe Dresser: This large dresser provides tons of storage in a room without appearing bulky thanks to its tall-standing brass legs and clean lines. The two-tone white lacquer and walnut wood combination gives this dresser a modern and trendy look that stands out no matter where it’s placed, whether in the living room or bedroom.

Joybird furniture

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Lonny Rug: Woven with a bright, colorful zigzag pattern, this geometric rug adds bold style from the ground up. It’s the perfect addition to a neutral bedroom, alongside other Mid-century style Joybird furniture pieces, or as a pop of color to offset white furnishings. Try anchoring an office or kids room with this rug for a bright foundation you can easily decorate on top of.

Get inspiration for Mid-century modern interior design!

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My Modsy Story: Designing My First Open-Concept Layout From Scratch

When Sara found an apartment that reflected her new, more “grown-up” lifestyle, she was excited to move in and start a new phase of life. But she was uncertain how to create a cohesive look for the empty open-concept living-dining room.

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Homeowner: Sara M.

Spaces: Open Living-Dining Room

My Style: Mod Visionary

empty view of customers living room

The Backstory

“I’d been living in the same apartment for years after graduating college when I finally decided it was time to move. I wanted to upgrade my living space and personal interior design style at the same time to reflect my new, more grown-up life. I was so excited when I found a beautiful apartment with a large open-concept living-dining room, but I knew my assortment of college-era Craigslist furniture would not work in my new space.”

customer design

The Design Dilemma

“In the process of moving, I got rid of almost all my old furniture—I wanted my new apartment to be a fresh start where I could fill the space with all new items that showcased my personal style. But I’m no interior designer, and I quickly became overwhelmed at the prospect of designing my large living-dining room alone.

I’ve never lived in an open-concept space before, so I really had no idea how I was going to create separate zones for the dining and living areas that worked together as a cohesive whole. Because I was also coming into space with almost no furniture, I needed to find a design that worked quickly, which was very intimidating!”

“I’m no interior designer, and I quickly became overwhelmed at the prospect of designing my large living-dining room alone.”

open living dining room

The Modsy Moment

“I’d considered hiring a traditional interior decorator, but in the middle of COVID, having a stranger come into my home didn’t seem like a safe choice. Luckily, I knew of a few online interior design services and I decided I would feel more comfortable working with a designer remotely. After doing some research, I found that Modsy’s design packages offered the right level of design help for my living-dining room project.

The style quiz I took at the beginning of my project really reassured me that I’d get the right style for my space. Receiving two initial designs at the same time meant I was able to quickly decide on layout and decor options—helping visualize exactly how the different areas of the room would flow together. Finally, the 3D Editor tool helped me tweak my designs and really hone in on what I wanted the space to look like.”

“Receiving two initial designs at the same time meant I was able to quickly decide on layout and decor options”

open living dining room

The Real Results

“Before Modsy, I had this big, empty, open living space that I had no idea how to layout. But having some expert help and seeing different design options really got the ball rolling for me.

Modsy made it easy for me to see the full potential of my apartment by collaborating with me on a great design. When it came time for me to renew my lease, I did so without giving it a second thought. I’m just so at peace in my space and love my design so much, and it’s uplifting simply to be here—I can’t imagine moving anytime soon. I can’t wait to start having guests again so I can show off space and how at home I feel in it.”

“When it came time for me to renew my lease, I did so without giving it a second thought. I’m just so at peace in my space and love my design so much, and it’s uplifting simply to be here—I can’t imagine moving anytime soon”

Ready to create a cohesive look for your space?

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Merging Styles: How to Combine Traditional and Modern Furniture

When couples move in together, they often struggle with how to combine their design styles. We often have couples asking about how to merge their different styles into one look or what to do when each partner wants something totally different out of their space. So much of this comes down to favoring different styles. And one of the most common style combination struggles is when one partner loves modern design and the other is more of a traditionalist.

Mixing traditional and contemporary design elements can be quite a challenge since they’re on opposite ends of the design spectrum. Not only are the lines and shapes present in modern and traditional spaces quite different—but the sheer amount of stuff in a traditional vs modern space tends to be quite opposite. While not always the case, modern spaces tend to have a more pared-back, minimalist bent, whereas traditional spaces lean more maximalist, with more going on visually.

But with design, as in love, opposites attract. And you can create quite a beautiful, comfortable home by combining traditional and modern design sensibilities. Since this is a combination we see often among Modsy customers, we want to outline some tips on how to combine modern and traditional furniture pieces. But before we get to the couples’ design tips, let’s define our terms.

traditional and modern bedroom combination style

Traditional Interior Design

Traditional design often refers to older Americana styles of Colonial and Craftsman. But, as Traditional design ideas rise in popularity, designers are also pulling inspiration from British design. (Think: English manor house or countryside cottage.)

Traditional spaces tend to feature dark wood furnishings. Craftsman and Colonial furnishings have minimal ornamentation, while Victorian-era furniture pieces lean a bit more ornate and detailed. Patterned and leather upholstery are both common in traditional style, as are wallpapered walls, slipcovered sofas, and finishing details like wainscotting and crown molding. In terms of color schemes, a blue and white palette is a classic traditional look. But for those who lean more toward the British take on traditional, saturated, earthy colors are common. Brass is the most common metal finish you’ll find in a traditional space, due to its beautiful patina that takes on an antique vibe.

Traditional design, as a whole, is an understated, less formal style that tends to focus on comfort and livability.

traditional and modern bedroom combination style

Modern Interior Design

When people talk about preferring a modern aesthetic, they’re often (though not always) referring to Mid-Century Modern. So, for our purposes today, we’ll define Mid-Century Modern design ideas. This style is inspired by mid-20th-century design and combines natural wood with bold colors. Furniture has clean lines and organic shapes with minimal ornament beyond the shape of the piece itself. It also tends to have tapered edges and rounded edges without any hard angles.

Colors in these spaces tend to be bold, with primary and secondary colors used most often. Think: teal, red, orange, yellow, and green. Graphic, geometric patterns are also common in these spaces. Wood tones tend to be lighter—either a Scandinavian blonde finish or an acorn or teak coloring. Though, a dark walnut finish isn’t out of the question! When it comes to metal, chrome is the most common finish you’ll find in a mid-century space, though brass and black metal are also used. For upholstery, leather, tweed, and vinyl are all common fabrics used on furniture.

Overall, Mid-Century interiors are comfortable and focus on relaxation and conversation.

traditional and modern bedroom combination style

Blending Modern and Traditional Design Elements

This is a good time to think about the five “spectrums of style” that we unpacked in our Interior Design & You seminar this fall. During our session on discovering your personal style, we talked about the style spectrums of old and new, as well as formal and casual. When you look at the “pure” versions of these styles, they probably feel drastically different. But a home that blends traditional and modern furniture styles exists somewhere in the middle of both of these spectrums. Watch the seminar to learn more!

And there are a couple specific areas where they overlap, which is a great starting point for couples looking to combine these two styles. Most notably, relaxed comfort is a priority in both of these styles. So, as a couple, you can both feel confident that you can create a home that’s really livable, feels comfortable, and is a space where you can relax and unwind.

But that’s not all! Read on for our top tips on how to combine modern and traditional furniture and design elements into one space!

Read Next: A lot can happen when combining styles. Learn about when to break the style rules

combine modern and traditional furniture | mixing furniture styles

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1. Go Modern in Your Base Furniture

When mixing interior design styles, one style is always going to be slightly more dominant. When it comes to traditional and modern furniture styles, modern is easier to have as a base because of its cleaner lines. And, since traditional pieces tend to have a bit more personality, they’re easier to sprinkle in as accents. In this space, you can see we went for modern shapes in the sofa, accent chairs, and coffee table. However, the accent pieces—like the side table and the rug—are much more traditional. This mixing of forms gives a very dynamic look to your space. The traditional pedestal side table next to the sleek sofa and coffee table creates balance and focus in this space.

Just remember—you don’t want to mix anything ultra-modern with something super traditional. (Like a super mod egg chair with an antique, spindle side table!) Your space will feel more balanced if you keep elements “middle of the road” without jumping too deep into either style.

bedroom with bent iron king bed and neutral palette decor

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2. Turn the Dial More Traditional with Your Accents

The accent pieces you choose in your space can totally shift the vibe, pushing the overall look more modern or traditional. Consider this especially when picking out a rug, artwork, and tabletop decor. In this bedroom, opting for botanical-inspired prints feels more traditional, while abstract art leans more modern and eclectic. You could also go for a more traditional art piece, but lean it on a shelf instead of hanging in on a wall, or hang a print in poster hangers instead of a full-frame. Either approach will give a traditional subject a more modern spin.

With rugs, a lighter, vintage-inspired rug will feel more traditional, while a bold geometric rug will feel more modern. And a vibrant Turkish or Oriental-style rug is a perfect way to combine these two styles since this type of rug is found in very traditional and even classic homes, but it’s also popular in Mid-Century and Modern Rustic spaces.

Layering rugs is also a great way to add a more modern and casual aesthetic to a living room or bedroom. Try a neutral woven rug as your base, with a slightly smaller patterned rectangular rug on top. This will add depth and a more modern feel to your space. You can also layer by hiding rugs, which can add an organic shape to a more traditional space. (Keep scrolling for a perfect visual example of this…)

bedroom with tall upholstered headboard and navy blue paneling on the walls

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3. Opt for Modern Twists on Traditional Silhouettes

However, if you want to take a traditional-first approach (rather than modern being the dominant style) find base furniture with traditional silhouettes—but with a modern twist. A modern finish is a great way to achieve this balance because what determines the style of a piece of furniture is not just the shape, but also the finish.

Take this headboard for example. It’s tall and tufted, which gives it a more traditional vibe. But its pared-back form and cool grey upholstery give it a more modern perspective. The same approach could be taken in a living room, with sofas or accent furniture. A traditional roll-arm sofa can feel updated and modern with a contemporary upholstery. And a spindle-leg coffee table in a sleek finish, like a matte black wood, accessorized with modern accents and objects will give your set-up a more contemporary vibe.

combine modern and traditional furniture | mixing furniture styles

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4. Use Color to Set the Tone

Traditional spaces—especially those that lean toward that adorned British style—feature more warm and saturated color palettes. Meanwhile, modern color palettes are inherently more monochromatic and on the “cool” color spectrum. When combining these two styles, there are two approaches you can take with color, both of which will help set the tone for this blended style.

Pairing a modern, neutral color scheme with traditional furniture pieces is one way to go. This lets the rich wood tones and ornamentation of traditional furniture do the talking in the space. However, pairing a warm and saturated color palette with modern-lined, neutral furniture is another way to blend these styles into one space. In the room above, we went for the latter; the dark wall is a classic, saturated green—but the white brick and lighter wood tones of the modern bookcases create contrast and establish a more updated look.

living room that combines both traditional and updated design

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5. Mix Materials and Finishes

Mixing materials is another great way to blend traditional and contemporary styles together. In this space, the use of a chandelier is a more traditional move, but the minimalist style in a black metal finish adds a modern touch. Additionally, the mix of the brass mirror, seagrass bench, and hide rug adds a more eclectic and modern feel to the space, while still using more traditional materials and finishes. Warm, worn leather is a more classic material—but the form of the chair, with its clean lines and tapered legs, gives it a more modern vibe. Textural fabrics like tweed can happily be used to tie together both styles as well.

And think about wood tones as well. While Mid-Century furniture styles don’t tend to feature lighter wood tones, we mentioned that a dark walnut finish is sometimes used in these spaces—and walnut is a common finish in traditional spaces. However, mixing wood tones is a great way to bring in the heart of both styles! You can also mix darker woods (more traditional) with shiny metals (a total mid-century modern move) for a fun material combo.

tall ceiling living room with seating area placed in front of fireplace

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6. Balance Out Traditional Architecture

In a home with traditional design elements, be sure to highlight any architectural details—from fireplaces and crown molding to wainscotting or chair rails. But don’t be afraid to give them a modern twist! Paint your wainscotting a bold, saturated color rather than a more traditional neutral tone. If your space has detailed trim and molding, consider going for the same color on your trim and your wall—a very modern move. Or take a brick fireplace into the modern world with a whitewash or by painting the brick black for a more modern vibe!

But you could also leave these traditional architectural details more “intact” and simply balance them out with modern foundations through your furniture styles and the layout of the space. Matching, classically shaped sofas facing each other opposite a brick fireplace would feel very traditional indeed. But opting for a more eclectic mix of comfortable furniture and a more conversational layout will balance the traditional architecture and make the whole space feel more relaxed. Curtains flanking all the windows is a very traditional move—but using solid, dark drapery is bold and modern.

combine modern and traditional furniture | mixing furniture styles

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7. Embrace (or Play With) Symmetry

Similar to your choices in decorative accents, symmetry in your layout and styling is a way to turn the dial-up or down, depending on if you want to focus a little more on modern or traditional. As a design principle, symmetry is a more traditional move. But the way you style symmetry within a space will make it lean more formal or casual. For example, you could also opt for modern furniture in a formal layout, or play with expectations within a formal layout. For example, the bedroom above features a sense of symmetry, but the mismatched nightstands and sleek furniture give the space a more modern appeal.

Needless to say, there are a ton of ways you can combine modern and traditional design styles into one space. And if you need some help, our expert Modsy designers are pros at combining interior design styles.

Need help combining two styles in your room design?

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Design History Spotlight: The Cultural Origins of the Bachelor Pad in the Mid-Century

How the mid-century bachelor pad challenged and informed gender norms of the time. This post is based on a lecture by Modsy’s VP of Style + Design Historian, Alessandra Wood.

The bachelor pad has become somewhat of a cultural icon. It’s the crash pad of single men—the domain where they watch sports, entertain friends and dates, and create a home that’s not a mismatch of hand-me-downs but a cohesive space that reflects the preferences of the dweller (with hopefully not a futon in sight).

When we think of the concept of home and how one creates a space that makes them feel comfortable and reflects their style, we probably aren’t shocked by the idea of a single man (or woman!) creating a nice home for himself. While today we’re in an era where home probably feels less gendered, this was not always the case.

In fact, in the 1950s, the home was still very much seen as the women’s realm. Less than 100 years ago, it would have caused some raised eyebrows, had a young, single man taken care to decorate his home, or had a young, unmarried woman opted to live on her own. These things were just not done. It wasn’t the norm. But where did these “norms” come from, and how did they change?

bachelor pad decor

Home as Women’s Realm

The home became known as a woman’s sphere in the Victorian era. During the Industrial Revolution, there was a cultural shift that caused a more distinct split between the domestic and public spheres. As the world got dirtier and scarier—with loud machinery, the rise of factories and mass production, and murderers like Jack the Ripper wandering the streets—women and children (at least those in middle and upper-class families) spent more and more time at home. With that, the public sphere became the men’s realm, and the domestic sphere was owned and run by women.

This continued up until World War II when women were thrust into what were traditionally men’s roles. With men off fighting in the war, women stepped into industrial and manual labor jobs to meet the needs of the time. But when the war ended, there was a big cultural push for all those Rosie the Riveters to go back home, to “put women back in their places.” With this, women resumed “traditional” gender roles and the idea of the nuclear family was established.

So, in the mid-century, the home once again became highly gendered and was considered the space of women. Women were seen as decision-makers in the home, and a bulk of domestic advertising was geared towards them. While their husbands brought home the money, it was the wives who were largely making the decisions around spending.

Around this time, after World War II, there was a major housing shortage in the USA, and white middle-class families were fleeing the cities and moving into suburban developments. With all of this, the ideology of “The American Dream” was born, with people striving after that quintessential lifestyle portrayed in shows like The Wonder Years. 

Of course, all this—the nuclear family, the gender roles, the suburbs—was all created around heteronormative ideals and catered toward white families. Those of different races, gender identities, relationships statuses, and values need not apply.

bachelor pad decor

How the Mid-Century Bachelor Pad Challenged Gender Norms

However, in the late 1950s and early 1960s, these norms got shaken up a bit. There are so many cultural things at play during this time. But when we hone in on interior design, it was the advent of the bachelor pad that contributed to this shake-up.

Prior to this, it was not accepted that you could be both a masculine man and a person who was proud of the design of your home. But with the advent of the bachelor pad came a challenge to the idea that home was strictly a woman’s space. Of course, while challenging gender stereotypes it was also reinforcing stereotypes of 1950s masculinity—but it was a step in a different, less-gendered, direction.

bachelor pad decor

bachelor pad decor

Playboy’s Penthouse Apartment

Playboy magazine, which launched in 1953, was known for touting a hyper-masculine ideal. But in the late 1950s, it started trumpeting the idea that an interest in a well-designed life and home can be part of this modern masculine man. As part of this, they created the modern bachelor pad when they published a feature on Playboy’s Penthouse Apartment. This “dream home”—sketched out by a real architect—showed the idealized design for a bachelor pad apartment, and what sophisticated single men would include in their homes. In this, they began rewriting the narrative of gender expectations in domestic interiors. A man can care about creating a well-designed home, without the help of a wife or mother!

Essentially, in creating this penthouse apartment, they layered in the notion that mid-century masculinity could include someone who cared about their own personal appearance and the design of their space.

bachelor pad decor

So, what did this penthouse look like?

  • It’s located in an urban apartment building and owned by someone who had a good stream of income—contrasting with the norm of wealthier people moving to the suburbs)
  • It has a large footprint overall, with a super modern design
  • The kitchen is quite small—indicative that this fellow is probably eating out or getting takeout more than he’s cooking
  • About one-third of the apartment is taken up by the bedroom and office, showing the importance of both work and sexuality to the modern man of the time
  • The entertaining space of the living room is also quite large and is filled with designed objects and cultural artifacts, showing off how worldly this type of man is
  • The bathroom is also spacious, suggesting that men can care about their appearances

Overall, this home is beautifully designed and leveraged the most recent and popular designs. Publishing this piece made it “safe” for hyper-masculine men to dabble in this home space that had for so long been seen as the women’s realm.

bachelor pad decor

In 1961, Playboy furthered this idea with their “Design for Living” article, which highlighted rising stars of mid-century modern design—all of whom were men. In this, they once again gave men permission to care about what they brought into their homes. By introducing the readers of Playboy to another level of arts and design, they were showing them that they could have ownership of their homes and see a well-designed and considered home as a new symbol of their masculinity.

This shift in mentality continued as other men’s magazines imitated this formula and with Playboy publishing other bachelor pad dream homes, like the Playboy Townhouse.

bachelor pad decor

What it Meant to Be a Bachelor in the Mid-Century

All of this led to new ideas around what it meant to be a bachelor in the mid-century. If you look at the articles and advertisements that were published in the late 50s and early 60s, themes begin to emerge. The “ideal” bachelor was surrounded by the latest technology, was well-read and worldly, had a well-stocked liquor cabinet within arms reach. Photos of women in these rooms reinforced the ideal of a heteronormative identity—proving this guy was interested in beautiful women. Early on, these bachelor pads featured twin beds—indicating there was no funny business happening in this space. But as time went on, this began to shift. By the time Playboy released sketches of their townhouse, the bed was a huge fixture within the bedroom, with plenty of room for a partner and a room well-stocked for entertaining guests.

Ultimately, all this showed that a bachelor like the men these spaces were designed for has a refined palette, cares about design, and is single and free to enjoy himself—not being tied down by a wife or kids.

As men started having their own spaces and caring about their home design, it presented a cultural challenge to the traditional idea of masculinity—and it was one of the small steps that brought us to where we are today.

bachelor pad decor

Now, Back to Today

Today, bachelor pads are still very much a cultural icon. In their most ideal realities, they include grand views from high-rise buildings, modern, no-frills furnishings, and the space to entertain. Sounds nice, right?

Fortunately, the idea of a single man or woman, living on their own, is no longer revolutionary. Because of these cultural strides taken in the mid-century, we all have so much more freedom to live the way we want and design a home we love. At Modsy, we’re big believers that design isn’t gendered and you should create a space that reflects you. It’s simply a matter of figuring out what you like and want and bringing it into your home, regardless of trends or cultural norms!

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Interior Design & You: Building Your Dream Moodboard

Welcome to Interior Design & You, a virtual design seminar led by Alessandra Wood, Modsy’s VP of Style. In this series, you’ll learn some of the basics of interior design, as well as how to personalize your own home. Karina Lameraner, Modsy’s brand image and content guru, led us through session three, Building a Moodboard. Watch it below—or scroll through the post for a recap!

When it comes to designing a room, moodboards are a great way to kick off the creative design process. In the world of interior design, they’re a way to plan, visualize, gather inspiration, concept, and experiment. They help with discovery; pairing furniture, colors, and decor together; and visualizing how everything will fit together. They’re especially great for visual learners who need to see things together before committing to a design.

interior design moodboard

What is a Moodboard?

A moodboard is a board—physical or digital—where you can collect imagery that inspires you. It can be broad, acting more as a vision board for things you love in many different areas of life, or it can be more specific, helping you figure out what things go together.

When creating a moodboard for interior design ideas, there are a couple different types of moodboards you can create. And each is unique with their own purpose and visual direction.

A Few Types of Moodboards:

interior design moodboardThe first type of interior design moodboard brings furniture and decor pieces together to help you see how all the pieces will fit and stylistically go together. This is a great type of moodboard to create during the furniture shopping or pre-furniture-shopping process. If you see a great piece you love, either in a store or online, you can pull it into a moodboard to help with inspiration overload or see how it might work with other things you already own!

interior design moodboard

The second type of moodboard you can create is geared more toward space planning. With this type of board, you can bring textures, finishes, and paint colors together to see how they’ll work with one another in a space.

interior design moodboard

The third type of moodboard is much more abstract. It’s a collection of inspirational images that, together, evoke a feeling or emotion that sets a vibe or literal mood for a space. All the images don’t all have to go together, and they can represent different things. The main purpose here is to gather images you love and are naturally drawn to.

All three of these different types of interior design moodboards aid in the creative process of discovery, as well as pairing and saving things together. You can also bring all three of these moodboard styles together into one board!

interior design moodboard

Why Create a Moodboard?

Moodboards are great tools for planning to see how a space will come together. They’re used for high-level concepting and as a way of playing with different design ideas through visual experimentation.

Overall, the main purpose of a moodboard is to gather inspiration and set a tone or vibe for a design project. Of course, you don’t have to actively be working on a home project to create a moodboard! You can simply create a moodboard to stay inspired, or tinker and play with things you might be attracted to for future use.

Gathering Inspiration

Inspiration is key in creating a moodboard. And, when you’re using a moodboard to collect home design inspiration, it’s also key in building a space that you’ll love!

But where can one gather inspiration and actual imagery for moodboards? Pinterest is a great place to start, since you can not only discover so much inspiration and imagery, but you can save it and organize it on boards. Instagram is another great place for finding inspiration. To connect with the interior design world, follow interior designers whose style you enjoy and observe how designs unfold in real homes!

You can also get out of the digital world and seek inspiration through books and magazines. And we’re not just talking about interior design publications. Branch out into travel books and fashion magazines and get inspired by design elements in all realms of life. You’ll probably find colors, shapes, and styles that you like by branching beyond interior design. You can even venture into the international section of your local magazine stand and pick out a few publications from different countries. This will offer you new and interesting perspectives—and the imagery is stunning!

Some of Karina’s favorite publications of the moment?

Live Beautiful by Athena Calderone

Travel Home by Caitlin Flemming and Julie Goebel

Elle Decor

Dwell

Domino

Veranda

And, of course, you can turn to the world around you. Get outside for a walk and take photos of plants or shops or building architecture or houses that inspire you. You can also look in more unexpected areas to help inform your design style, mood, and overall aesthetic. Turn to your wardrobe, brands you buy from, restaurants you frequent, or places you like to vacation. There are often little elements from each area where you can pull inspiration that will help inform your direction.

interior design moodboard

Building a Moodboard

When building a moodboard, we recommend starting really big and broad, then get more granular as you go. So, start with one image or one piece of furniture , then work you way into the details. You don’t have to have everything in place all at once. Part of the moodboarding process is gathering imagery you love over time!

Bring in imagery of furniture pieces you love; establish a color scheme through paint paint swatches and objects; bring in architectural details and textures, as well as rugs and flooring ideas; and layer in specific pieces of art, lighting, and decor that help set the mood.

As we mentioned earlier, this collection of images could be for a room that you’re actually getting ready to design, offering you or your interior designer a great jumping off point—or it could just be a fun project to get you inspired even if you don’t have the time, budget, or need for a room redesign!

And remember—there really is no wrong approach when it comes to a moodboard. Making one is an incredibly personal journey and the process can be unique to you. Go with what feels right, and let the pieces speak for themselves.

Tools + Resources

Ready to get moodboarding like a pro? It’s all about using the right tools. (And don’t worry, they’re not complicated.)

To create a digital moodboard, we love programs like Keynote (for Apple users), PowerPoint, or Google Slides. Each of these programs make it easy to drag in photos you’ve collected, arrange them in layers, and move them around. Canva is a free app that’s easy to use. It lets you create moodboards with your own imagery, and you can use it on your phone or computer. And, of course, Photoshop is a classic, though not as many people have access to it, and there’s a definite learning curve as you get started with that program.

When creating a moodboard digitally, go ahead and save images to your desktop as you go, then organize them into folders after an inspiration session. From there, you can then easily drag inspiration photos into whichever moodboard you might be working, or simply copy and paste photos into a document!

You can also make “hard copy” moodboards by hand! Try cutting images out of magazines and pinning them on a board. For tactile learners, this will help you better visualize how everything works together. And it’s also a great option for those who love to cut images out of magazines and catalogs!

Ready to get started? Dive in! And share your finished moodboard with us on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook! And remember, with Modsy, we can take your moodboard ideas and bring them to life through our virtual interior design services. You can also take our style quiz to identify your interior design style and learn what your style says about you. So, get inspired and have some fun!

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Style Spotlight: 4 Ways to Get the Modern Southwest Look

If you’ve been noticing—and loving—a lot of Southwestern design on your Instagram and Pinterest feeds lately, you’re not alone. In fact, Modern Southwest interior design is one of our favorite trendy styles of the moment!

Modern Southwest design features a mix of mid-century and rustic elements, combined in a way that recalls the desert Southwest. It’s a close cousin of modern rustic interior design and desert minimal design. The difference being that Modern Southwest puts more emphasis on desert and Southwestern motifs than modern rustic and is more eclectic than desert minimal design. In fact, this look is very rooted in the idea of being a literal world traveller, with a home that features collected objects from around the world.

In terms of color palettes, Modern Southwest features earthy palettes in saturated tones—like terracotta, brick reds, olive greens, and blues, as well as natural materials and heavy leathers (in more of a cognac that dark brown tone). You’ll also see a lot of deep, dark woods in this style. But it’s not all earthy, natural elements. There’s also this high-contrast element that brings in the modern side of this style. Many Modern Southwest rooms feature bright white walls and black accents in the furniture and decor.

Southwestern living is embodied in this warm and youthful, with rooms that feel inviting and lived-in. Global-inspired, geometric, and Southewestern patterns add a playful air to this style; you’ll see these patterns a lot in textiles and accent decor like vases and rugs. Shibori and ikat patterns are very big in Southwestern decorating, as are jute, Moroccan, kilim, souk, shag, and overdyed rugs. And, while these are popular motifs right now, this is a style that won’t feel tired or overdone in a few years.

Ready to explore some modern design ideas in the realm of Modern Southwestern design? We had our designers create four different takes on this style to show you the different ways that it can come to life. Which one is your favorite?

modern southwest interior design

Giddy Up

This take on Modern Southwest really leans into Western-inspired design elements. This comes through in the decor—specifically the wall art, the hide stool, and the hide rug. Though the rug, with its gold flecking adds a playful and modern element to the space—as does the marble-top tulip table. This table, paired with the woven chair with their metal legs creates a lovely mix of modern and rustic in this dining nook. And the layers of textured pillows on the bench? It creates a very cozy and rustic feel.

The classic Southwestern color palette—full of terracottas, browns, black, white, and cream—is what keeps this look from falling flat or feeling too western. In fact, it makes for a very earthy, relaxing, and inviting palette. We think it would feel right at home in a Waco living room or San Antonio designer’s portfolio!

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modern southwest interior design

Cool-Girl Vibes

This Modern Southwest living room has a very cool-girl vibe. Earthy tones throughout this living room give the space nuance and warmth, with the pale, dusty pinks reminding us of a desert sunset. And the natural, woven textures found in the textiles and accent chair add to the Southwest rustic vibe. While the base of this room is very Southwestern, some unexpected ultra-modern moments up the playful, cool factor.

When it comes to Southwest decoration, the wall art and literal cactus help set the vibe, as do the textiles. There’s some fun pattern play in the rugs, with the patterned jute rug layered under the kilim rug, and a hide rug under the accent chair. But then the modern elements come into play and give this room a really cool finish. The cascading modern pendant light adds a very unexpected and sculptural moment to this room. And you might not think to use a clear acrylic coffee table in a more rustic space, but it gives the room a very open and airy vibe—as do the sleek white walls. The cognac leather sofa ties together the whole look. It has a modern shape, but the color and finish of the leather lends itself to a Southwestern rustic vibe.

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modern southwest interior design

Minimal But Eclectic

While this is a more minimal take on Modern Southwest, it still has the eclectic vibe that makes this style so fun. The bed is obviously the foundation of this space; it has very modern and minimal lines, but the spindles hint at rustic style. From there, the room gets a bit more rustic and eclectic, with the help of natural materials.

The woven rattan on the stools and the plush shag rug bring in that rustic element. But the stools themselves add an eclectic vibe, with their high-contrast black frames. The baskets on the wall also speak to the eclectic collector part of Modern Southwest design, with their global-inspired weaves. And the print on both the throw pillow and the rug add to the overall Southwestern vibe.

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 modern southwest interior design

Modern Santa Fe

The walls in this Modern Southwest living room aren’t a bright white like the other designs we’ve shared—which gives this room an almost Santa Fe-inspired design. But it’s definitely a bit more modern than your average Santa Fe look. Curved shapes are big in this design—from the curved console and mirror to the arms of the sofa and the ottoman. The use of soft, rounded edges and arches are very sculptural and are reminiscent of classic soutwestern architecture.

But, while the furniture in this space skews very modern, the accents lean more rustic and eclectic. The saturated earth tones used throughout—from rusts and browns to terracottas—are very desert-inspired. And a mix of natural materials like rattan, wicker, and unfinished woods add to that earthy, rustic vibe and really shine in this space. The leather sofa and the woven leather seat of the accent chair mix nicely with the other natural elements in this space, and their finish bring the modern shapes of these pieces more toward rustic style.

While we opted to go more neutral and subdued in this space, you can get really colorful and playful with Modern Southwest design. All you’d have to do is incorporate brighter accent pillows and add higher contrast elements throughout the space—like olive tones, blues, and black metal accents.

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image3-112

Then & Now: How the Mid-Century Modern Design Trend Has Changed Over Time

Mid-century modern design has been one of the most popular interior design styles for decades. It first came onto the design scene in the late 1950s, and it has been a pillar of modern interiors since. (If you’re curious about the full scope of Mid-Century Modern’s influence on design today, listen to our deep dive into the history of the style in our new podcast, The Render.)

Like many other design movements, mid-century modern style has changed over the years, reinterpreted in myriad ways to suit the interiors of the times. Most recently during the early 2000s, the millennial design aesthetic gave rise to a new mid-century modern trend that favored pared-down spaces, pastel hues, and traditional mid-century modern design staples. The look veered away from the traditional Mad Men vibe and gave rise to a more youthful version of mid-century modern that felt fresh, light, and anything but buttoned-up.

From that, we’re now seeing mid-century modern interiors move in the direction of embracing more boho touches, organic elements, and rustic notes.

Come along with us as we take a look and break down how the mid-century modern trend is taking shape now.

Classic Mid-Century Modern

Before we delve into the various new interpretations of the style, let’s take a look at its origins and some of the pieces that made this an iconic interior design aesthetic.

From the very beginning, mid-century modern design championed the use of new materials ranging from plastics to fiberglass. There was also a focus on geometric and streamlined forms in furniture, and the sculptural chairs designed by Le Corbusier, Eero Saarinen, and Harry Bertoia are among the iconic pieces that came to define the mid-century modern aesthetic. Today, these are still some of the most coveted designs in homes, whether it’s in a cool and airy minimalist living room or a warm and inviting modern dining space.

Mid-Century Modern trendAnother style that contributed to the mid-century modern movement was Scandinavian design, which adhered to the same modernist principles. Although it focused on furnishings with an organic approach inspired by shapes found in nature. These designs boasted materials, such as natural woods, like birch and ash, which are elements seen in many of the furniture pieces by Mid-Century designers, including Charles and Ray Eames, George Nelson, and Isamu Noguchi. Many of these iconic wood pieces, most notably the Eames lounge chair, are considered staples in modernist homes today.

But what does Mid-Century Modern look like today? Here are a few ways we’ve seen this trend evolve and take new stylistic forms!

Mid-Century Modern trendMid-Century Meets Boho

Mixing color, texture, and pattern into the mid-century modern look is what sets apart this look. It’s also a style that’s commonly blended in with the millennial interior design aesthetic.

Mid-Century Modern trendIt’s About Patterns

Part of what makes the mid-century boho look is its lively layering of patterns paired with modern design. From boho dots to kilim textiles and graphic stripes, it’s an approach to bold textiles and eye-catching prints that work beautifully in mid-century modern bedrooms.

Key Elements: Boho-patterned pillows, rug, and art, nightstands with tapered legs, woven bench, textural decor (colorful baskets, painted wood objects, two-tone ceramics)

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Mid-Century Modern trendIt’s About Bright Colors

Mid-century boho style also emphasizes a mix of colorful textiles. In addition to patterns, you’ll find a warm palette of rusty red, deep blue, earthy brown, and bright orange. If you love mid-century organic forms with a pop, the eclectic hues give this style a casual and hip vibe.

Key Elements: Kilim-style upholstered bench, layers of colorful pillows for comfort, rattan ottoman, walnut wood side table and chairs, mid-century modern sofa

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Mid-Century Modern trendIt’s About An Eclectic Mix

Alongside the vibrant colors and patterns, the boho mid-century look also highlights clean-lined furniture and sculptural forms. You’ll find tapered legs, organic silhouettes as well as key vintage styles, such as sputnik lights and Wishbone chairs, resulting in an eclectic design mix.

Key Elements: Vintage-style rug, Wishbone-style chairs, atomic light fixture, clean-lined walnut dining table, brass accents, smooth ceramics, tall greenery.

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Mid-Century Modern trendOrganic Modernism

In recent years, organic modern interior design has been a big focus in homes. Known as Organic Modernism, it combines mid-century modern design with earthy organic elements.

Mid-Century Modern trendThere Are Natural Materials

True to its moniker, Organic Modernism highlights the use of mid-century designs featuring natural materials. From light-wood and leather furnishings to natural fibers, such as jute, sisal, and rattan, it’s all about bringing out the warm textures and beauty of organic materials.

Key Elements: Jute rounded pouf, leather-and-wood daybed, shibori-upholstered swivel chair, light-wood coffee tables, handwoven rug, cotton sofa, glass and ceramic objects

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Mid-Century Modern trendThere Are Earthy Elements

Besides natural materials, you’ll also find colors and shapes that recall nature, from rustic brown and ocean blue to sundials and curvy modern design. These details give a sense of warmth as well as softness that help to set an inviting and livable tone in Organic Modernist rooms.

Key Elements: Minimalist maple-wood console, ornate mid-century round mirror, earthy color palette, two-toned modern chair, organic-shaped decor (sculptural vase, rounded bowl)

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Mid-Century Modern trend

There Are Organic Designs

From combining rich leather, textural woods, woven accents, and metal pieces, the emphasis is on mid-century furnishings with an organic edge. The result are spaces that play up the Organic Modernism look while still feeling livable, distinctive, and perfectly balanced.

Key Elements: Leather platform bed, mid-century-style rounded accent chair, grainy light-wood dresser, organic shape accents (vases, ceramic bust), simple patterned rug and pillows.

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Mid-Century Modern trendModern Rustic

Equal parts mid-century and rustic, Modern Rustic style plays up clean-lined designs that don’t sacrifice comfort for looks. It’s one of our most popular interior design styles among customers.

Mid-Century Modern trendThink Farmhouse Furnishings

What defines the Modern Rustic room is its mix of mid-century modern design with rustic materials and accents. It’s a streamlined slipcovered sofa paired with leather armchairs and graphic art alongside a raw wood bookcase. The result is a balance of style and big comfort.

Key Elements: Rustic vintage-inspired rug, natural-wood bookcase cabinet, leather-and-wood accent chair, hide ottomans, dark-wood tray-top cocktail tables.

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Mid-Century Modern trendThink Rustic Materials

Part of the mix includes rustic furnishings and elements with sleek materials and shapes. You can expect to find an industrial cabinet and an edgy mirror alongside classic mid-century seating and light fixtures. The idea is to play up a hard and soft contrast to create a bold yet livable vibe.

Key Elements: Log side table, natural-wood mid-century console cabinet, leather sofa with tufting and tapered legs, concrete-and-wood tables, glass pendants, rustic artwork.

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Mid-Century Modern trendThink Comforting Textures

Finally, with Modern Rustic style it truly comes down to the rich and nubby textures that give it that deep sense of homey comfort. These are the woven chair seats that add soft padding to the grainy wood table that looks and feels inviting, and the natural-fiber rug that opens up a room.

Key Elements: Rustic dining table, Wishbone-style chairs, organic shape tabletop accents (bowls, vessels), natural color palette, jute or sisal rug, mid-century-modern light fixture.

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What Is My Decorating Style? How to Discover Your Interior Design Style And Bring It to Life

When beginning to design a room in your home, one of the first steps is to land on your interior design style, as that will guide the rest of the decisions you make. Easier said than done, right? There are so many home decor styles out there—and between Pinterest, Instagram, and blogs, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed with inspiration overload!

If you’re wondering, “What is my interior design style?” we’re here to help! Today, we’re breaking down the most popular interior design styles to help you get a sense of what’s out there for furniture design styles. And we’ll show you how to discover your personal style! But here’s the best part: You don’t have to choose just one interior design style! In fact, most people don’t gravitate toward one pure style. Rather, you’ll probably end up with a mix of a few different interior design styles which will create a look that is perfectly suited to you and your home!

Our magically accurate Modsy design style quiz is also here to help. By answering a couple of questions, we can help you discover and hone in on your personal interior design style. Taking this quiz will also help our Modsy designers create a space that beautifully reflects your style and preferences if you opt to use our interior design packages.

But for now, we’ll dive in and break down the most popular interior design styles so you never have to wonder, “What is my decorating style??” again!

Minimalist Interior Design Style

Minimalist design upholds the principle that form follows function and is guided by the idea that “less is more.” Minimalist interiors are generally void of decorative objects and have minimal amounts of furniture. What is present is often geometric in shape. This look is all about creating a space with what you need, and nothing more.

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The Key Elements:

Furniture and decor found in Minimalist interiors are often made of raw, natural materials such as concrete, stone, marble, wood, and steel. Walls and surfaces usually have smooth and natural finishes. Color palettes found in these modern and contemporary spaces tend to be muted, with lots of black, white, and grey. But a bold pop of a single color isn’t uncommon.

You know this is your style when…

You crave functionality and no-fuss spaces, and if you prefer architectural elements over decor.

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Mid-Century Modern Interior Design

Mid-Century Modern interior design has long been the “it” look in the design world. Inspired by mid-twentieth-century design, this modern style combines natural wood with bold colors. Furniture designed in this style has slightly whimsical and organic shapes that seem to cradle the body. They tend to have minimal ornament beyond the shape of the piece itself—something this style has in common with minimalism. However, unlike minimalism, Mid-Century Modern interiors have more of a focus on comfort.

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The Key Elements:

Part of the comfortable element of Mid-Century Modern spaces is their focus on natural wood (typically a blonde, walnut, or teak wood). However, you’ll also find tweed, leather, laminate, vinyl, and chrome. Furniture pieces often have hairpin or tapered legs and feature an organic approach to their shapes and forms. You can have a lot of fun with color in a Mid-Century Modern space, using colors like teal, red, orange, yellow, and green.

You know this is your style when…

You love slightly whimsical furniture designs that feature organic shapes and love a blast from the past!

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scandinavian interior designScandinavian Interior Design Style

As you might expect, Scandinavian interior design has its roots in the Scandinavian countries of Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. Time outdoors, appreciating the beauty of nature, is a huge value in these countries, and that love of nature has woven its way into the very fabric of Scandinavian designs. This interior design style features a beautiful mix of minimalist and modern style elements. A style that values function over form, there’s a focus on practicality in Scandinavian designs. But that doesn’t mean aesthetics aren’t considered—quite the opposite, in fact! Scandinavian interior design is beautiful, but it’s simply a style where everything has a purpose and a place.

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The Key Elements:

Scandinavian interiors feature clean lines, minimalist styling, and plenty of warm, light woods for a very organic feel. Neutral, black and white color schemes are common in Scandinaian interiors. While light shades like whites and creams are the primary color used in these spaces, pops of dark contrast that keep the look from feeling sterile or unapproachable. The wide use of natural materials also brings a lot of warmth into Scandinavian designs. With its nature-inspired aesthetic, maximizing natural light is also huge in this style. So, keep your window coverings light and airy!

You know this is your style when…

You love a minimalist aesthetic but prefer a bit of organic warmth in your home.

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Industrial Interior Design Style

Industrial interior design is characterized by vintage decorative objects appropriate to warehouse or factory settings. Overall, industrial furniture and spaces will have a distressed feel to them. This style fits particularly well in lofts with exposed brick or ductwork, but it can also come to life in a space that’s not naturally architecturally industrial.

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The Key Elements:

Anything with a reclaimed vibe or a rugged patina is ideal for an industrial space. Materials used in Industrial interior design tends to include metal, brick, distressed or reclaimed wood, concrete, and piping. Many finishes include raw or untreated materials, or materials that show signs of aging. And color schemes found in Industrial designs tend to follow this rugged vein, gravitating toward greys, blacks, and browns alongside wood and brick.

You know this is your style when…

You love old looks with rugged edges, or if you’re trendy and hip and have an urban vibe!

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Rustic Interior Design Style

Rustic design is another incredibly popular interior design style. It celebrates the vintage charm of pre-industrial design styles for a look that is comfortable, warm, and inviting. Rustic style features traditional furniture made of natural, weathered wood, combined with simple accessories and one-of-a-kind pieces.

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The Key Elements:

Rustic interiors tend to feature a lot of texture and natural materials—like reclaimed wood, leather with a patina, linen, stone, brick, as well as sheepskin and natural fiber rugs! Rustic style furniture tends to have an antique or vintage-inspired flair, often with distressed finishes. Color palettes in Rustic interiors tend to feature warm and neutral tones, along with plenty of beige.

You know this is your style when…

You love being home and relish that homey feeling.

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rustic farmhouse bedroomFarmhouse Interior Design Style

Farmhouse style has been having a major moment for the last couple of years, thanks to shows like Fixer Upper and bloggers jumping on the bandwagon of Joanna Gaines-inspired designs! Farmhouse interior design takes inspiration from the look and style of actual farmhouses, using decorative elements that are rural and agriculturally inspired. Homes designed with Farmhouse style are full of charm and character, and feel very warm and inviting. Currently, Modern Farmhouse style is the most popular form of Farmhouse design—but there are many different ways that this style can come to life.

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The Key Elements:

Comfort is definitely at the center of Farmhouse interior design. So, the use of rustic, weathered woods—whether in a natural or whitewashed finish—is common in Farmhouse style. But Modern Farmhouse spaces balance that desire for comfort with contemporary design elements. Color palettes in Farmhouse interiors are often more neutral, but can feature pops of earthy tones. And, while classic Farmhouse interior design veers very rustic, more trendy takes like Modern Farmhouse and Rustic Farmhouse bring in moments of industrial contrast—like opting for dark metal finishes in light fixtures and accent furniture—to give a Farmhouse space a bit more of a modern spin.

You know this is your style when…

You wish you could have Joanna Gaines design your home and like a space that feels both stylish and approachable.

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Eclectic or Boho Interior Design Style

Eclectic interior design features an approachable, informal mix of furnishings and decor from a wide variety of styles. This style often reflects a worldly collection of objects, combining bright colors and patterns and unexpected elements. Eclectic style can come together in a million different ways—but it always ends up being a representation of the dweller’s life and personality. Bohemian and eclectic, as style terms, are often used interchangeably—though there are some subtle differences between Bohemian style and Eclectic style.

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The Key Elements:

Bohemian interiors feel organic and like they came together over a period of time. You’ll often find a mix of natural materials in Eclectic or Boho spaces—like jute, rattan, wicker, bamboo, and woven or embroidered pieces. And a fun mix of global-inspired or botanical patterns is a must when embracing bohemian style. Boho and Eclectic interiors tend to feature a mix of bright or jewel-tone colors like red, yellow, pink, and green—along with plenty of bold natural greenery!

You know this is your style when…

You want your home to be a curated collection of your travels and experience! It’s bold and fun, just like you.

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Hollywood Glam Interior Design Style

Hollywood Glam interior design is a bold, dramatic, and often over-the-top style that mixes unexpected elements. But it can also be very refined. With roots in classical design, Hollywood Glam gives classical elements a glamorous facelift through colors and materials. Though there are several ways you can style your glam space, the look always mixes patterns and pieces from a variety of different styles in order to create a luxurious and unique feel. Glam spaces—whether veering toward Hollywood Regency, Art Deco, or Boho Glam—feel more formal and designed and often have many statement pieces and bold artwork.

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The Key Elements:

Decorative accents in a Hollywood Glam space tend to be very ornamental, and furniture usually has detailed carvings or soft, curved frames. You’ll find materials like velvet and fur in a glam space, along with metallics and mirrored surfaces. Animal prints and large-scale patterns are always at home in a Hollywood Glam home, while color palettes can range from a high-contrast black and white palette to bold jewel tones or bright whites and pastels. And if you gravitate toward the Art Deco side of Glam, you’ll also incorporate geometric patterns and decorative materials.

You know this is your style when…

You may be a bit over-the-top, and you like it. You just have a taste for the finer things in life!

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Contemporary or Transitional Interior Design Style

Contemporary (or transitional) interior design is a comfortable and approachable style that feels fresh and clean without being stark and minimal. This style often relies on balance and symmetry within the space and follows the more traditional “rules” for interior design. While it has an elegant, polished feel, it’s meant to be lived in with and still has plenty of style!

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The Key Elements:

Furniture in Contemporary spaces prioritize comfort, with cushions and upholstery that are plush and inviting, and featuring materials like velvet and suede. You’ll find ceramics, wood, glass, and mirrored surfaces throughout, which add to the visual mix of traditional and modern. As for color schemes, Contemporary spaces tend to feature plenty of neutrals, along with navy, yellow, and pops of other colors.

You know this is your style when…

You like order and style! You want an aesthetically pleasing space without being too trendy or too traditional.

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Traditional Interior Design Style

When you hear the word traditional, you might think formal and stuffy. But that’s not the case with today’s Traditional interior design! Rather, this is an understated and less-formal style that pulls inspiration from Colonial and Craftsman interiors. While it’s not particularly popular or on-trend, there’s a reason this style has stood the test of time!

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The Key Elements:

Spaces featuring Traditional interior design tend to include furniture with dark leather upholstery or muted woven patterns, along with dark wood furnishings with minimal ornamental details. Incorporating antiques in a Traditional space is a perfect way to add a unique element and an authentic vibe. A classic blue and white color palette is often found in Traditional spaces, but you can also gravitate toward earth tones or deeply saturated colors.

You know this is your style when…

You like the comfort of traditional things and don’t care about following trends!

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Classic Formal Interior Design Style

Interiors decorated with classic formal style have traditional elements and expected arrangements. It’s a style that relies on antique and heirloom pieces of furniture to create an elegant, formal feel to a space. This style takes inspiration from old-school French, Neoclassical, and Colonial design styles. Ultimately, it’s a look that is formal and elegant.

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The Key Elements:

Classic Formal interior design relies on European and American antiques (or replicas) in perfect condition—not distressed—to set the tone for the space. Wood furniture will tend to be in mahogany, ebony, or cherry finishes. This style also features tons of classic patterns, from damask and floral to chinoiserie and toile. These patterns are layered in furniture upholstery, drapery, and bedding. Throughout a classic formal space you’ll see rich tones of reds, blues, yellows, and greens.

You know this is your style when…

You like antiques and a classic, symmetrical feel.

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Coastal Interior Design Style

Coastal style is meant to evoke the breeziness of the beach. It’s a style that has a clean, soft, and natural aesthetic. Nothing should feel too stiff or ultra-formal; instead, coastal style is inviting and comfortable with lots of soft fabrics and cozy silhouettes.

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The Key Elements:

Spaces decorated with coastal style should feature tonal blues and crisp whites mixed with soft earth tones. You’ll find a variety of natural textures in Coastal spaces—like jute, seagrass, driftwood, linen, wicker, and rattan. Wood tones should be light in color, like blonde maple or ash. Whitewashed wood and slipcovered furniture are also common in coastal spaces. A few beachy accessories like seashells, glass bottles, woven baskets are great, but too many and the space will start to feel kitschy and overly thematic.

You know this is your style when…

You like the easy and breezy feeling of being near the water. This style feels like a forever vacation in your home!

Explore Coastal Design Ideas

Want to hear a few of our style experts talk more about these styles? Queue up the first episode of our podcast, The Render, to get some in-depth insights on all of these styles and learn to spot them in the wild with fun examples from popular movies and TV shows! Find our podcast here.

Still stumped on your interior design style? Take our style quiz!

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(Episode 3) The Render Visual Companion: Why Is the World So Obsessed With Mid-Century Modern Design?

Welcome to the visual companion to the third episode of The Render. The Render is a podcast hosted by Modsy’s very own Alessandra Wood and Maddy Warner, and is all about the untold stories from the world of interior design.

In our third episode, Maddy and Alessandra are joined by special guest and Mid-Century Modern expert, Lark Morgenstern, as they unpack why the world is so obsessed with Mid-Century Modern design.

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The Render is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to your podcasts!

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If your dreams are filled with Shell chairs and Tulip tables, you’re probably a lover of Mid-Century Modern design. But even if the sight of an Eames lounge chair makes you roll your eyes, there’s no denying that this style has dominated the interior design landscape for the past 50 years. Why is the world so obsessed with Mid-Century Modern design?

Today, we’ll be joined by an expert in Mid-Century Modern design, Lark Morgenstern from 1st Dibs, to unpack the answer to that question. We’ll talk about the style’s rise to popularity, its resurgence in the 90s, some designers to know (beyond the Eames), where the trend is heading in the future, and we even get into the surprising connection between the Playboy mansion and Mid-Century Modern design.

Brazillian Mid-Century Design

Some amazing mid-century furniture designs came out of Brazil in the 1950s and 60s.

A part of furniture and design history that doesn’t get studied or celebrated as much in popular culture. But right now, Brazillian mid-century designs are having a moment in the spotlight.

Paulistano Chair

Alessandra is a proud owner of this baby.

The Dawn of Modernism

If you’ve studied design history or even know a little about furniture, you’ve likely heard the terms “Scandinavian design” or “Danish design” tossed around in conversations about interior design. But what exactly is Scandinavian or Danish design and how do these styles fit into the larger Mid-Century Modern story?

Scandinavian Design

What Lark calls a “self-created concept,” Scandinavian design really launched onto the design scene in the mid-50 with the 1954 Design in Scandinavia exhibition. This was a beautiful exhibit where designers from all over the Scandinavian countries showcased their work, and it toured the United States for three years.

1954 Design in Scandinavia exhibition

While this exhibit was touring, we were also in the middle of the Mid-Century Modern boom in the US. American consumers, who were already primed to be partial to notions of “good design,” loved their work and snapped these pieces up.

Learn more about the Mid-Century notion of “Good Design” in Episode 1 of The Render.

Scandinavian vs. Mid-Century Modern Design

While both styles fall under the larger umbrella of modernism, there are some subtle differences between Scandinavian and Mid-Century Modern design. More like close cousins than siblings, these styles are both very focused on geometric forms and came on to the scene at the same time.

Mid-Century Modern design focused on the use of new materials like plastics, fiberglass, wire, and aluminum. By contrast, Scandinavian design took a much more organic approach to the same modernist principles. These designs feature more natural materials like wood, specifically birch and ash varieties, which are native to the area. Scandinavian design also tends to be softer, and references the organic forms found in nature.

 

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Alvar Aalto Savoy Vase

An iconic Finnish design, the Savoy vase is a glass vessel with an organic, amoeba-like shape.

 

Cranbrook Academy of the Arts

How did Scandinavian design influence American mid-century design?

Of course, design doesn’t happen in a vacuum. And in fact, designers from these different movements were looking at each other’s work and there was some “cross-pollination” between their schools of thought.

So many of the designers that we associate with the movement—think Charles and Ray Eames, Harry Bertoia, Eero Saarinen, and George Nelson—studied at Cranbrook Academy of the Arts. This was a school founded by Eliel Saarinen (Eero Saarinen’s father) who was the school’s architect and president.

As such, a lot of the Scandinavian design principles trickled down through that and influenced many of these Mid-Century designers and is one of the reasons we think of Scandinavian design as inherent to Mid-Century Modern in so many ways.

The Re-Popularization of Mid-Century Modern Design

One of the big questions we’re trying to answer, is why is Mid-Century Modern design so popular again today? Over the past decade, we’ve seen Mid-Century Modern become the number one style, and it’s still our most-requested style here at Modsy.

Has Mid-Century Modern Ever Gone Out of Style?

Today it might seem like Mid-Century Modern style has always been popular, but there was a time when it was not such a popular style. In the 80s and early 90s, there was a short time period when Mid-Century Modern was equated with “grandparent’s style” in a dated, not trendy way.

This was the era of the “McMansion” and many people were looking to traditional and classic styles when furnishing their homes—think 90s sitcom style—while Mid-Century Modern felt dated.

Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Style

The traditional furnishings that were popular when Gen-Xers were growing up.

The Resurgence of Mid-Century Modern Style

At the end of the late 90s, we see Gen-X helping to create a resurgence in Mid-Century Modern design. At this time, Mid-Century Modern furniture wasn’t popular, which also meant that it was really affordable. You could find cool, well-designed furniture like an Eames lounge or Nakashima table (that today go for thousands of dollars) at crazy affordable prices.

 

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Wallpaper Magazine

The “bible” of the cool, urban Gen-Xers who all of a sudden have jobs and money and are ready to buy apartments and fill them with furniture. Instead of adopting the style of their parents, this generation is really defined by the Mid-Century Modern style. Wallpaper Magazine featured photo essays of cool, Mid-Century Modern houses and effectively made them the It style.

 

Tom Ford’s Mid-Century Modern Home

 

Men in Black Mid-Century Modern Set

Check out those Swan chairs, originally designed by Arne Jacobsen.

Mid-Century Modern Designers

One of the big differentiators between this time period and others was that you as a regular person can own something that was created or designed by a “genius.” This was also the era of the designer, and these people were considered almost celebrities so there was added allure to owning their pieces.

 

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Charles and Ray Eames

 

 

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Harry Bertoia

 

Eero Saarinen

 

George Nelson

 

1961 Designers Playboy Spread

 

Playboy Bachelor Pad

What’s In and What’s Out? The Mid-Century Modern Collector’s Market

Just like the stock market, in the collector’s market we see certain pieces of furniture, designers, or even design styles that go up and down in value. This is particularly evident in Mid-Century Modern designs, which are so widely copied and reproduced.

Designs Trending Down in Popularity

The pieces Lark says are losing steam in the collector’s market.

 

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Hans Wegner Papa Bear Chair

Lark’s favorite example of the rise and fall of the collector’s market.

Once the market gets flooded with these widely-copied designs and the value of them drops.

 

 

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Eames Lounge Chair

Probably the most-copied design from the Mid-Century Modern era, you can get cheap knock-offs of the Eames Lounge design on sites like Amazon. After 30 years of popularity, we think these loungers are on their way out.

Designs That Hold Their Value

The pieces that have held their value for decades in the collector’s market.

Marshmallow Sofa

A piece that is definitive of the Mid-Century Modern era, Lark thinks this is a design that will never go out of style.

Mesa Coffee Table

More intricate designs tend to hold their value over time.

Designs Trending Up in Popularity

What’s trending right now in the collectors market?

 

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Cesca Chair

A design by Marcel Breuer, we’re calling the Cesca chair the new Eames shell chair.

 

Jeanneret Chair

A super chic, and cool looking chair design from India, get the scoop on the story behind this iconic design.

Mid-Century Modern Design in Pop Culture

Mid-Century Modern has always enjoyed a prominent place in our country’s popular culture. Here are a few of the ways it’s showing up on the scene in the 21st century.

 

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The Kardashians

Spotted on Kourtney Kardashian’s Instagram. It’s no wonder this chair is having a moment in the spotlight.

 

Mad Men

The show that introduced the general public to Mid-Century Modern design in the late 2000s, we couldn’t do an episode on this style without talking about the iconic interiors of AMC’s Mad Men.

The two main character’s offices are the perfect examples of two different takes on Mid-Century Modern.

Roger Sterling’s Office

A more feminine, chic take on Mid-Century Modern design. His office is much more youthful, poppy, and even fun and features pieces by designers like Eero Saarinen and Italian designers.

Don Draper’s Office

In contrast to Roger’s space, Don’s office features a much more masculine take on Mid-Century Modern design.

On Set With the Eames Lounge Chair

A piece of furniture associated with very “cool” people, we often see the Eames lounge chair in more masculine environments.

 

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Shark Tank Set

Even on the new set of Shark Tank, all the investors now sit in white leather Eames Loungers.

 

 

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Frasier Crane

Another TV character who owns a lounger.

What’s Next?

Some of Lark’s predictions on the designs that will soon be trending.

 

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Mel Smilow’s Designs

A new designer to take a look at.

 

Ernest Race’s Antelope Chair

Lina Bo Bardi

An Italian designer who moved to Brazil after WWII.

organic modernismOrganic Modernism

You heard it here first folks! The Mid-Century Modern trend is taking an organic turn. This style pulls in rustic elements to a Mid-Century framework and infuses the style with a sense of warmth and creature comforts—something we could all use right about now.

Take the Organic Modern home tour

Thanks again to Lark Morgenstern for Joining us!

Lark Morgenstern is a decorative art and design specialist. She has a B.B.A in Strategic Design + Management and an M.A in History of Design and Curatorial Studies from Parsons School of Design. Over her career, she has worked in furniture and fine art galleries. In 2016, she founded the 133 Design Collective, a network of artists, designers, and performers, and curated exhibitions showcasing young designer’s work.

She currently works as the Senior Business Associate for the 1stdibs Art + Design Research team where she acts as team lead for design specialists that review the 1stdibs marketplace and develops partnerships with archives, designers, and artist estates. This past year, she served on the vetting committee for the Salon Art + Design Fair. Prior to 1stdibs, she worked as a Curatorial Assistant at the Brooklyn Museum in the Decorative Arts and American Art Department.

Recently, she co-founded Coco + Morgenstern, a company geared to helping those at the entry and mid-career level find jobs in the art + design world.

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18 Mid Century Living Rooms That Will Make Your Retro Heart Swoon

Mid-century modern was the iconic style of the 1950s and 60s and its timeless appeal has made it a mainstay in the world of interior design. Mid-century living room ideas combine a number of modern elements, artistry, and simple practicality to create an immediately recognizable look. You might imagine Don Draper’s office or the lobby of the Grand Budapest Hotel, which are excellent examples of the mid-century look. But if you want to play around a little with the interior design of your living room, there are actually tons of mid-century design ideas out there! If you like a more minimal aesthetic, blend mid-century and minimal designs for a clean, pared-down vibe. Love the boho look? Blend mid-century design ideas with lots of plants, patterns, and colors for a modern rustic vibe. Or maybe rustic interior design is your thing? Go modern farmhouse for a look that’s trendy and cozy all at once.

This is all that to say there are many ways to design a mid century modern living room. Get inspired by the following designs to see the full range of ways you can get this look!

mid century living roomA Touch of Glam

It’s no surprise that mid-century modern furniture can easily be glammed up for extra style! The walnut and marble coffee table and the tapered legs and open frame of the armchairs chairs are mid-century all the way. The gold velvet sofa adds a dazzling touch to this design and helps create a cozy conversation area. It is also in line with the jewel tones around the rest of the room—they add a bright and funky vibe while brass touches give the room more sass! This living room is great for the mid-century modernist who loves a bright pop of color and a statement piece you can’t miss.

mid century living roomNeutral Territory

Mid-century modern living room design doesn’t have to be loud and flamboyant! Tapered leg furniture makes this living room unmistakably mid-century modern while the neutral color palette and leather pouf on floor feel minimal in style. It benefits from a soothing color palette with warm neutrals like camel leather and shades of brown. Then, just throw in some pops of black and white for balance! This living room feels casual and cozy, and the low furniture and soft edges make it a kid-friendly space. The tripod lighting adds a fun retro touch, too.

mid century living roomDown-to-Earth Style

This mid-century modern living room blends retro furniture forms with a color palette that’s on the earthier side for a warm, cozy look. The musky green barrel chair is super retro and adds a funky pop of color into the mix. The leather pouf and landscape art also offer an earthy touch. We love the mid century modern thin leg coffee table and floor lamp. Meanwhile, the simple styling and geometric rug bring space together for a cohesive design.

Mod Enthusiast Living

This mid-century modern living room features a number of signature modern elements, like walnut wood finishes, the tapered leg chair and sofa, and a geometric rug. But the neutral color palette with pops of black and grey definitely adds a more contemporary vibe to the decor choices. The living room is minimal in decor, with an open and bright layout. Similar wood tones and signature mid-century modern touches of brass bring this look together. This is a great look for those who love mid century modern living room design but want a more subdued version of the style.

Mod Visionary Living Space

This living room is mid-century modern to the max in all of its forms and materials—walnut wood furniture in geometric forms, tapered legs, and thin metal are the elements that make this look iconic. To update the look with contemporary styling, you can add decor like minimal sculptures, oversized neutral art, sleek bookcase items, etc. The color palette of the living room is neutral with warm whites and greys, warmed up with lots of wood. It’s a great look for those who want mid-century modern style with a clean streamlined aesthetic.

Iconic Mid Century Living

This is a beautiful example of pure mid-century modern living room design. The sofa is lifted on a wood base with very retro legs. It has a very mid-century modern style with a neutral color scheme and pops of avocado green, and geometric patterns. Warm wood tones add warmth and a homey feeling to modern living rooms like this. And the iconic Noguchi coffee table is simple but stands out! All of the furniture pieces are architectural—like works of art—so they don’t need extra frills.

Mod Collector Space

Mid-century modern living room design typically sticks to a subdued color scheme with pops of bright primary colors. But living rooms can definitely be spiced up a little with more vibrant hues! The furniture is pure mid-century, like the camel leather sofa on tapered legs and blue upholstered armchair. A sculptural atomic light fixture in brass is mid-century, along with other lights in the room. The colors are in the iconic retro palette—muted jewel tones, primary colors, etc—but more vibrant hues than you usually see! Modern living rooms like this are great if you love mid-century modern style but want a slightly more eclectic flair.

Pastel Chic Mid Century

We love mid-century modern living rooms with an added hint of glam! This modern interior design features marble, brass, and velvet accents. The Kilim style rug and a sculptural atomic style pendant adds a polished touch. This look is great for mid-century modern style lover who wants a living room filled with bright and fun colors, shapes, and forms.

Relaxed and Retro

This style has plenty of mid-century modern elements, like the tapered and angled furniture legs, wood tones, and shag geometric rug. The oatmeal sofa pops against a muted mustard-colored wall, keeping the palette mostly earth toned with pops of blue. It’s a cohesive style with a balance of patterns, solids, and wood tones. If you’re a lover of mid-century modern design but prefer more earthy, warm vibes, this look might be just right for you!

Atomic Industrial

This mid-century modern living room design features a signature tapered leg sectional and sculptural light fixture to showcase the style. But it also boasts a hint of industrial flair with darker tones, natural wood and metal coffee table, and more rugged style artwork. The overall look is unexpected and creates a unique and cozy vibe! A light colored rug adds light balance to the darker color palette so it has warmth without feeling too grey. This look is perfect for those who want a hint of mid-century modern with a moodier feel.

Boomerangs And Sputniks

This mid-century modern living room focuses on primary colors for a bright, vibrant look! The tapered legs and Noguchi coffee table ground the room in mid-century modern design and the orb style pendant lights and starburst mirror are iconic retro pieces. A cool, geometric rug pulls all of the colors and patterns together and anchors the seating area to create a cozy, conversational space. It’s a great look for those who love mid-century-modern style but want bright colors and pure style.

Peachy Mid Century

Instead of going all out with bold, primary colors, some mid-century modern living rooms focus on a soft color palette. The furniture pieces here are pure mid-century style with tapered legs, a formal sofa and a marble/wood coffee table. But then the design incorporates rosy pinks, mauve, and a white and blush rug along with pops of blue. Overall, living rooms with this color palette will have a simple and soft appearance, but with defined mid-century style.

Organic Modernism

We love this “Organic modernist” look featuring sculptural furniture instead of lots of decor. The chairs are perfect examples, as they feature a formed leather seat and thin metal base. Lighting brings an industrial vibe through in the materials but uses organic shapes for a softer feel. The colors are very muted, neutral, and soft for that organic modern touch! Only a small amount of decor is used and it’s all made from natural material—stone, wood, ceramic, etc. This is a great mid-century modern living room design for those who appreciate a natural aesthetic.

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Modern Rustic Living

For this modern living room design, we went with a rustic style and touches of mid-century flair. The fabrics in the pillows, bench, and rug are rustic all the way and make the room feel homey and warm. The furniture form is classic mid-century modern, but the wood tones are lighter than typical and add a boho feel. The room has a formal layout with conversational seating but casual vibe to create a laid-back, inviting living room in trendy modern rustic style.

Edgy Modern Style

This mid-century modern living room design features a leather sofa on metal legs and a black mid-century form coffee table, both of which have a slightly industrial edge! The black and white color palette is warmed up by a jute rug, camel leather sofa, and wood frames, making the space both stylish and inviting. The tripod brass lamp is classic mid-century modern and the multi-patterns gallery wall has touches of both mid-century and industrial and adds tons of visual interest.

Pure Retro Vibes

For all of you hardcore mid-century lovers out there, here’s another purist living room to show you what this style can do all on its own! This room features a slingback armchair with a sculptural form that makes a dramatic impact! The art deco art piece in back features primary colors and the overall palette showcases blue and yellow with warm wood tones. And at the center of the room is a signature Noguchi coffee table. This room is perfect for those who love pure, undiluted mid-century modern style.

Mid Century Minimalism

This living room offers a deluxe example of mid-century modern meets minimalist design. We love how the two styles blend together to create a sleek, cool take on the “Mad Men” aesthetic. The look features clean lines and a neutral color palette with darker greys and blues for a muted backdrop. The sculptural quality of the furniture pieces adds a sense of drama to the serene space! Every piece makes a statement, from the ladder bookcases, the Arco floor lamp, to the gorgeous tulip table. Like the best minimalist designs, it manages to say a lot with a little!

Mod Enthusiast

For this look, we mingled contemporary stylings with a mid-century aesthetic to get a look every Mod enthusiast will love. It’s a more approachable take on mid-century and the contemporary pieces make it super relaxed and livable. It has a transitional foundation to the style that prioritizes comfort—and then retro accents are layered on top. Although the living room has a mostly neutral palette, pops of leather, wood, and brass liven it up and add extra warmth. The armchairs and gourd table lamps have a distinct mid-century modern form. This look is perfect if you like a cozy aesthetic with hints of retro, but don’t want to go full-throttle on mid-century modern.

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